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Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon,
Second Disciple of Yang Sau Chung, Fifth Generation Yang Family Lineage

The world mourns the sad lost of another great master of the traditional Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan, Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon. He passed away on the 18th March 2019 in Boston, USA. He was the second disciple of Master Yang Sau Chung, the eldest son of the famous Yang Cheng Fu.

Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon first learnt Tai Chi from Lai Hok Soon in Hong Kong in 1956. After the death of his first teacher in 1964, he continued his Tai Chi training in Hong Kong with Master Yang Sau Chung, the Fourth Generation lineage holder of the Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan.

In 1968, Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon moved to the United States and opened a year later, the Gin Soon Tai Chi Club in Boston, Massachusetts where he taught traditional Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan to numerous students in Boston and across the world.

Both Vincent Chu and Gordon Chu, the sons of Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon continue his legacy in teachings traditional Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan as they have learned from their father at the Boston Tai Chi Club.

Master Ding and his family together with Master Ding Academy’s students all express our deepest condolences to the family of Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon and his numerous students throughout the world.

We have been informed that his funeral will be take place at 11am on Monday, 25th March at Wing Fook Funeral Home, 13 Gerard Street, Boston.

More information about Gin Soon Tai Chi Club can be founded on the club’s website:
www.gstaichi.org
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Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon,
Second Disciple of Yang Sau Chung, Fifth Generation Yang Family Lineage 

The world mourns the sad lost of another great master of the traditional Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan, Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon. He passed away on the 18th March 2019 in Boston, USA. He was the second disciple of Master Yang Sau Chung, the eldest son of the famous Yang Cheng Fu. 

Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon first learnt Tai Chi from Lai Hok Soon in Hong Kong in 1956. After the death of his first teacher in 1964, he continued his Tai Chi training in Hong Kong with Master Yang Sau Chung, the Fourth Generation lineage holder of the Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan.

In 1968, Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon moved to the United States and opened a year later, the Gin Soon Tai Chi Club in Boston, Massachusetts where he taught traditional Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan to numerous students in Boston and across the world.

Both Vincent Chu and Gordon Chu, the sons of Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon continue his legacy in teachings traditional Yang Family Tai Chi Chuan as they have learned from their father at the Boston Tai Chi Club.

Master Ding and his family together with Master Ding Academy’s students all express our deepest condolences to the family of Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon and his numerous students throughout the world. 

We have been informed that his funeral will be take place at 11am on Monday, 25th March at Wing Fook Funeral Home, 13 Gerard Street, Boston.

More information about Gin Soon Tai Chi Club can be founded on the club’s website:
http://www.gstaichi.org

 

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Rip Grandmaster Chu Gin Soon 🙏🏾.

Expressing Deep regret

R.i.p. G.Master

Have a merry time during the festive season and a great New Year!

May the force be with you all.

From Master Ding, Master Alan Ding and all MDA instructors
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Have a merry time during the festive season and a great New Year! 

May the force be with you all.

From Master Ding, Master Alan Ding and all MDA instructors

 

Comment on Facebook

Merry Xmas & Happy New from a former Goodmayes Tai Chi pupil.

Merry Christmas and happy New Year Shigong and to all our brothers & sisters

Merry Christmas and happy New Year all our brothers & sisters

Merry Christmas and a very happy, healthy and prosperous New Year Sifu and the whole Tai Chi family 🌲

Wishing everyone a wonderful festive break!

Happy Christmas Marica - have a great one buddy. Catch up soon!! Xx

I hope you have a wonderful festive time too, best wishes 🎄😊🎄

Happy Christmas everyone!

Merry Christmas and happy New Year to you, your family and students too Master Ding. :)

Joyeux Noël à vous aussi!

Buon Natale e felice anno nuovo!

Merry Christmas Master of my Master

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Master Alan Ding and Master John Ding will be holding 2 special master classes in Florence, Italy:

1) A two days intensive Continuous Development Programme for MDA instructors and experienced Tai Chi practitioners

2. Open Master Classes for Tai Chi practitioners- Beginners to advanced and also for external martial arts practitioners

A golden opportunity to train with both Masters to understand and develop your skills in traditional Tai Chi Chuan.

Feel free to circulate this information to people you know who may be interested.

For more information, please contact the organiser.
... See MoreSee Less

Master Alan Ding and Master John Ding will be holding 2 special master classes in Florence, Italy:

1) A two days intensive Continuous Development Programme for MDA instructors  and experienced Tai Chi practitioners

2. Open Master Classes for Tai Chi practitioners- Beginners to advanced and also for external martial arts practitioners

A golden opportunity to train with both Masters to understand and develop your skills in traditional Tai Chi Chuan.

Feel free to  circulate this information to people you know who may be interested.

For more information, please contact the organiser.

Tai Chi could be the perfect activity for the rest of your life !

Harvard Women's Health Watch

The health benefits of tai chi

This gentle form of exercise can help maintain strength, flexibility, and balance, and could be the perfect activity for the rest of your life.
Updated: December 4, 2015 Published: May, 2009

Tai Chi is often described as "meditation in motion," but it might well be called "medication in motion."
There is growing evidence that this mind-body practice, which originated in China as a martial art, has value in treating or preventing many health problems. And you can get started even if you aren't in top shape or the best of health.

In this low-impact, slow-motion exercise, you go without pausing through a series of motions named for animal actions — for example, "white crane spreads its wings" — or martial arts moves, such as "box both ears."

As you move, you breathe deeply and naturally, focusing your attention — as in some kinds of meditation — on your bodily sensations. Tai chi differs from other types of exercise in several respects. The movements are usually circular and never forced, the muscles are relaxed rather than tensed, the joints are not fully extended or bent, and connective tissues are not stretched.

Tai chi can be easily adapted for anyone, from the most !t to people con!ned to wheelchairs or recovering from surgery.

Tai chi movement
"A growing body of carefully conducted research is building a compelling case for tai chi as an adjunct to standard medical treatment for the prevention and rehabilitation of many conditions commonly associated with age," says Peter M. Wayne, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Tai Chi and Mind-Body Research Program at Harvard Medical School's Osher Research Centre.
An adjunct therapy is one that's used together with primary medical treatments, either to address a disease itself or its primary symptoms, or, more generally, to improve a patient's functioning and quality of life.

Belief systems
You don't need to subscribe to or learn much about tai chi's roots in Chinese philosophy to enjoy its health benefits, but these concepts can help make sense of its approach:

Qi — an energy force thought to #ow through the body; tai chi is said to unblock and encourage the proper flow of qi.

Yin and yang — opposing elements thought to make up the universe that need to be kept in harmony. Tai chi is said to promote this balance.

Gauge your progress.
Most beginning programs and tai chi interventions tested in medical research last at least 12 weeks, with instruction once or twice a week and practice at home. By the end of that time, you should know whether you enjoy tai chi, and you may already notice positive physical and psychological changes.

No pain, big gains
Although tai chi is slow and gentle and doesn't leave you breathless, it addresses the key components of fitness — muscle strength, flexibility, balance, and, to a lesser degree, aerobic conditioning. Here's some of the evidence:

Muscle strength.
Tai chi can improve both lower-body strength and upper-body strength. When practiced regularly, tai chi can be comparable to resistance training and brisk walking.
"Although you aren't working with weights or resistance bands, the unsupported arm exercise involved in tai chi strengthens your upper body," says internist Dr. Gloria Yeh, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. "Tai chi strengthens both the lower and upper extremities and also the core muscles of the back and abdomen."

Flexibility.
Tai chi can boost upper- and lower-body flexibility as well as strength.

Balance.
Tai chi improves balance and, according to some studies, reduces falls. Proprioception — the ability to sense the position of one's body in space — declines with age. Tai chi helps train this sense, which is a function of sensory neurons in the inner ear and stretch receptors in the muscles and ligaments. Tai chi also improves muscle strength and #exibility, which makes it easier to recover from a stumble. Fear of falling can make you more likely to fall; some studies have found that tai chi training helps reduce that fear.

Aerobic conditioning.
Depending on the speed and size of the movements, tai chi can provide some aerobic bene!ts. If your clinician advises a more intense cardio workout with a higher heart rate than tai chi can o"er, you may need something more aerobic as well.
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